Washington, D.C.  – House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.) and Congressman Steve King (R-Iowa) have requested that the Government Accountability Office (GAO) study the cost of crime in the United States to better inform members of the House Judiciary Committee as it continues its bipartisan criminal justice reform initiative.

In 2014, there were nearly 1.2 million violent crimes and 8.3 million property crimes in the United States, generating substantial costs for Americans, communities, and the country. In a letter to Comptroller General Gene Dodaro, Goodlatte and King request that the GAO study this issue and breakdown the cost of crime for federal, state, and local governments.

Below is the text of the letter. A signed copy can be found here.

February 29, 2016

The Honorable Gene L. Dodaro
Comptroller General of the United States
Government Accountability Office
441 G St., NW
Washington, DC 20548

Dear Comptroller General Dodaro:

In June of last year, the House Judiciary Committee launched a criminal justice reform initiative.  Over the ensuing months, the Committee has addressed a variety of criminal justice issues through legislation. In order to assist our efforts in this endeavor, we are writing to you regarding our concerns about the cost of crime in the United States.  According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, there were an estimated 1,165,383 violent crimes and an estimated 8,277,829 property crimes in 2014. Undoubtedly, these and other crimes generate substantial costs to society at individual, community, and national levels.

Accordingly, we seek the assistance of the Government Accountability Office in fully investigating the cost of crime in the United States.  Specifically, we are interested in:

  1. The cost of Federal and State crimes to victims of crime:
    1. Total cost
    2. Cost by state
  2. The cost of crime to the United States economy and to state economies
  3. The cost of crime to Federal, State, and local governments
  4. The cost of crime, per year:
    1. Per type of criminal offense
    2. Average cost per criminal
    3. Average cost per victim
  5. The rate of recidivism of offenders who are released from terms of imprisonment, and the costs described under #1 through #3 for crimes committed by such offenders subsequent to their release

We look forward to working with you so that GAO can expeditiously complete this important task.  Please contact Jason Cervenak, counsel on the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security and Investigations with any questions (202-225-5727).  Thank you for your attention to this important matter.

Sincerely,

Bob Goodlatte
Chairman
Steve King
Member of Congress