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Chairman Nadler Issues Subpoena for Former White House Counsel Don McGahn

Apr 22, 2019

 

Washington, D.C. –Today, House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler (D-NY) issued a subpoena to former White House Counsel Donald F. McGahn II for testimony and documents related to the Committee's ongoing investigation into obstruction of justice, public corruption and other abuses of power by President Trump, his associates and members of his Administration.  Following revelations uncovered during the course of Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into obstruction of justice by President Trump, the House Judiciary Committee is seeking public testimony from Mr. McGahn, who is a critical witness to many of the alleged instances of obstruction of justice and other misconduct described in the Special Counsel's report.  

Below is a statement from Chairman Nadler, and a copy of the subpoena can be found here:  

"The Special Counsel's report, even in redacted form, outlines substantial evidence that President Trump engaged in obstruction and other abuses. It now falls to Congress to determine for itself the full scope of the misconduct and to decide what steps to take in the exercise of our duties of oversight, legislation and constitutional accountability. 

"Following the scheduled testimony of Attorney General William Barr on May 2, 2019 and the expected testimony of Special Counsel Robert Mueller, which we have requested, the Committee has now asked for documents from Mr. McGahn by May 7, and to hear from him in public on May 21. Mr. McGahn is a critical witness to many of the alleged instances of obstruction of justice and other misconduct described in the Mueller report. His testimony will help shed further light on the President's attacks on the rule of law, and his attempts to cover up those actions by lying to the American people and requesting others do the same. 

"The Special Counsel and his team made clear that based on their investigation, they were unable to 'reach [the] judgment . . . .that the President clearly did not commit obstruction of justice.'  As a co-equal branch of government, Congress has a constitutional obligation to hold the President accountable, and the planned hearings will be an important part of that process."

116th Congress