Accomplishments Report of the Committee on the Judiciary | 2019 - 2020

To view endnotes and a designed, printable version of this report, click here.


Message from the Chairman


The Judiciary Committee’s broad jurisdiction places it at the forefront of efforts to preserve the rule of law and to provide for a more just society that respects the civil rights and civil liberties of all Americans. Although our efforts to hold the Trump Administration accountable grabbed much of the headlines, the Committee also maintained a robust legislative agenda across all of its subcommittees that included numerous bipartisan achievements.

Under Democratic leadership, the Judiciary Committee took bold action to keep Americans safe in their communities, especially from gun violence, ensure free and fair elections without foreign interference or voter suppression tactics, provide for a more just and humane immigration system that aligns with our values and ideals, preserve access to justice in the federal courts, protect consumers from corporate abuses, lower prescription drug prices, and preserve a strong intellectual property system that promotes innovation and drives economic growth. In many cases, the Committee worked on a bipartisan basis to achieve important victories for the American people.

As the nation endured the challenge of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Committee took decisive action to guard Americans from price gouging, support small businesses, protect the health and rights of those who are incarcerated, ensure humane immigration practices, secure our elections, and conduct oversight of the executive branch’s response to the pandemic. And in response to the ongoing crisis of police brutality against African Americans and other people of color, the Committee advanced comprehensive police reform and accountability legislation, the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act.

I am proud to lead the Judiciary Committee during this critical moment in history and to work with my colleagues on the important work that lies ahead.

Chairman Jerrold Nadler




Table of Contents



Committee Membership

Responding to the COVID-19 Pandemic

Addressing Police Brutality and Systemic Racism Against the Black Community

Working Across the Aisle

Bipartisan Investigations

Protecting Americans from Gun Violence

Supporting First Responders, Law Enforcement, Servicemembers, and Veterans

Reducing the Cost of Prescription Drugs and Health Care

Protecting Consumers

Protecting the Rights of All Communities

Standing Up for Women

Protecting the Right to Vote and Securing America’s Elections

Providing a Check on Executive Power

Providing for a Just and Humane Immigration System

Strengthening the Nation’s Bankruptcy System

Ensuring a Strong Intellectual Property System

Keeping Americans Safe and Reforming our Criminal Justice System

Promoting Transparency, Efficiency, and Fairness in the Federal Courts

Examining President Trump’s Misconduct

Holding Hearings to Address Critical Issues Facing America

Taking Action in Committee: Markups

House Floor Votes

Turning Bills Into Laws

By the Numbers


To view endnotes and a designed, printable version of this report, click here.




 


Committee Membership



Democratic Members*

Jerrold Nadler | Chair, Committee on the Judiciary
NY-10

Zoe Lofgren | Chair, Subcommittee on Immigration and Citizenship
CA-19

Sheila Jackson Lee
TX-18

Steve Cohen | Chair, Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights, and Civil Liberties
TN-09

Henry C. "Hank" Johnson | Chair, Subcommittee on Courts, Intellectual Property, and the Internet
GA-04

Theodore E. Deutch 
FL-22

Karen Bass | Chair, Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, and Homeland Security
CA-37

Hakeem Jeffries
NY-08

David N. Cicilline | Chair, Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial, and Administrative Law
RI-01

Eric Swalwell
CA-15

Ted Lieu
CA-33

Jamie Raskin | Vice Chair, Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights, and Civil Liberties
MD-08

Pramila Jayapal | Vice Chair, Subcommittee on Immigration and Citizenship
WA-07

Val Butler Demings | Vice Chair, Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, and Homeland Security
FL-10

J. Luis Correa | Vice Chair, Subcommittee on Courts, Intellectual Property, and the Internet
CA-46

Mary Gay Scanlon | Vice Chair, Committee on the Judiciary
PA-05

Sylvia R. Garcia
TX-29

Joe Neguse | Vice Chair, Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial, and Administrative Law
CO-02

Lucy McBath
GA-06

Greg Stanton
AZ-09

Madeleine Dean
PA-04

Debbie Mucarsel-Powell
FL-26

Veronica Escobar
TX-16 

*Cedric Richmond (LA-02) served on the Committee until September 2020, when he joined the House Ways and Means Committee. 

 


Republican Members

Jim Jordan* | Ranking Member, Committee on the Judiciary
OH-04

F. James Sensenbrenner | Ranking Member, Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial, and Administrative Law
WI-05

Steve Chabot
OH-01

Louie Gohmert
TX-01

Doug Collins*
GA-09

Ken Buck | Ranking Member, Subcommittee on Immigration and Citizenship
CO-04

Martha Roby | Ranking Member, Subcommittee on Courts, Intellectual Property, and the Internet
AL-02

Matt Gaetz
FL-01

Mike Johnson | Ranking Member, Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights, and Civil Liberties
LA-04

Andy Biggs
AZ-05

Tom McClintock
CA-04

Debbie Lesko
AZ-08

Guy Reschenthaler
PA-14

Ben Cline
VA-06

Kelly Armstrong
ND-AL

W. Gregory Steube
FL-17

Tom Tiffany
WI-07**

*Rep. Doug Collins served as Ranking Member from January 3, 2019 until March 11, 2020.

** Rep. Tiffany joined the Committee on July 23, 2020, replacing Former Rep. John Ratcliffe (TX-04), who served on the Committee until May 22, 2020. 



 

 

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Responding to the COVID-19 Pandemic



The COVID-19 pandemic has upended everyone’s lives, infecting millions of people and killing more than 250,000 people in the United States. Millions more are facing economic uncertainty as businesses lay off workers and cut hours or close down completely. COVID-19 has impacted every part of our society, and the Judiciary Committee has worked with our partners on other committees and congressional leadership to address the impact of COVID-19 in a variety of ways. 

The bipartisan Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, which was signed into law on March 27th, included critical provisions of importance to the Committee. These provisions included funding to ensure voters can safely vote in the 2020 federal election cycle; funding to ensure access to justice; funding to protect the health of individuals who are incarcerated and other related provisions; bankruptcy protections for consumers and small businesses; provisions to ensure that independent contractors, gig workers, and freelancers qualify for the Paycheck Protection Program and Economic Injury Disaster Loans; and regulatory flexibility for the agencies responsible for administering the intellectual property system.

In May, the House of Representatives passed the HEROES Act to build upon the success of the CARES Act and aid Americans during this challenging time. The bill included many priorities for the Judiciary Committee, including funding for testing, treatment, and prevention of COVID–19 in prisons and jails; provisions to ensure first responders who die or become disabled during the pandemic receive the benefits they are owed; additional funding for the Violence Against Women Act to address the surge in domestic violence; funding for Legal Aid and local law enforcement; a ban on price gouging; protections for immigrants serving in essential critical infrastructure sectors; and bankruptcy protections for homeowners, among other provisions. In October, the House of Representatives passed an updated version of the HEROES Act with similar provisions.

The Committee has also been engaged in oversight of the executive branch, demanding that the administration address the spread of COVID-19 in federal prisons and in immigration detention facilities among prisoners, migrants, and staff; prohibit price gouging; and address the spread of ghost guns during the pandemic. In addition, the Committee examined the critical role that immigrants are playing as essential workers during the pandemic.

  • H.R. 6509, the “Public Safety Officer Pandemic Response Act of 2020”/ S. 3607, the “Safeguarding America's First Responders Act of 2020” [Passed House, LAW] 
  • H.R. 6414, the “COVID-19 Correctional Facility Emergency Response Act of 2020” [Passed House]  
  • H.R. 6400, the “Emergency Community Supervision Act” [Passed House]  
  • H.R. 5546, the “Effective Assistance of Counsel in the Digital Era Act” [Marked Up, Passed House]  
  • H.R. 3545, the “National Opposition to Hate, Assault, and Threats to Equality (NO HATE) Act of 2019” [Passed House] 
  • H.R. 8366, the "Protecting Homeowners in Bankruptcy Act of 2020" [Marked Up, Passed House]
  • Roundtable: Democratic Virtual Roundtable on ICE's Response to COVID-19
  • Roundtable: Democratic Virtual Roundtable on COVID-19 in Prisons & Jails
  • Hearing: Protecting the Right to Vote During the COVID-19 Pandemic
  • Hearing: Federal Courts During the Covid-19 Pandemic: Best Practices, Opportunities for Innovation, and Lessons for the Future
  • Hearing: Immigrants as Essential Workers During COVID-19

 

 

 

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Addressing Police Brutality and Systemic Racism Against the Black Community



The tragic and brutal death of George Floyd has been a wake-up call for millions of Americans about the ongoing crisis of police brutality against people of color, especially Black Americans. Police have shot and killed nearly 1.000 people in the past year and African Americans are more than twice as likely to be victims of deadly force by the police than white people. Black men between the ages of 15 and 34 are approximately 10 times more likely to be killed by police than other Americans. Across the nation and around the world, the streets have been lined with protesters demanding fundamental change in the culture of law enforcement and meaningful accountability for officers who commit misconduct.

Black Lives Matter. George Floyd matters. Breonna Taylor matters. Tony McDade, Eric Garner, Amadou Diallo, Tamir Rice, Walter Scott, LaQuan McDonald, and Rayshard Brooks matter. And the countless other people who have lost their lives at the hands of law enforcement matter. Yet, our laws have not reflected this fact.

That is why the Judiciary Committee, along with the Congressional Black Caucus, crafted the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act, which passed the Committee and the House of Representatives. This bill would finally allow for meaningful accountability in cases of police misconduct and would begin the process of reimagining policing in the 21st Century. 

This is not a new problem. Our country’s history of racism and racially motivated violence—rooted in the original sin of slavery—continues to haunt our nation. That is why since the beginning of this Congress, the House Judiciary Committee has been working to address the lasting legacy of slavery and lynching, the disproportionate impact of our nation’s marijuana laws on the Black community, and the disturbing prevalence of White Nationalism in the country.

  • H.R. 7120, the “George Floyd Justice in Policing Act of 2020” [Marked Up, Passed House]
  • H.R. 35, the “Emmett Till Antilynching Act” [Marked Up, Passed House]
  • H.R. 1636/S. 2163, the “Commission on the Social Status of Black Men and Boys Act” [Passed House, LAW]  
  • H.R. 3884, the “Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement (MORE) Act of 2019” [Marked Up]
  • H.R. 5602, the “Domestic Terrorism Prevention Act of 2020” [Marked Up, Passed House]
  • H.R. 5309, the "Creating a Respectful and Open World for Natural Hair (CROWN) Act of 2020" [Marked Up, Passed House]
  • Hearing: Oversight Hearing on Policing Practices (2019)
  • Hearing: Oversight Hearing on Policing Practices and Law Enforcement Accountability (2020)
  • Hearing: H.R. 40 and the Path to Restorative Justice
  • Hearing: Hate Crimes and the Rise of White Nationalism
  • Hearing: Marijuana Laws in America: Racial Justice and the Need for Reform

Spotlight: The George Floyd Justice in Policing Act makes it easier for the federal government to successfully prosecute police misconduct cases, effectively bans chokeholds, ends racial and religious profiling, encourages prosecutions independent from local police, and eliminates the dubious court-made doctrine of qualified immunity in civil rights lawsuits against law enforcement officers. At the same time, it works to prevent police violence and bias through a series of 'front-end' approaches aimed at encouraging departments to meet a gold standard in training, hiring, de-escalation strategies, bystander duty, use of body cameras, and other best practices. It also ends no-knock warrants in drug cases, stops the militarization of local policing, and requires the collection of data on a number of key policing matters, which would be made public—including the first-ever national database on police-misconduct incidents to prevent the movement of dangerous officers from department to department. Lastly, it creates a new grant program for community-based organizations to create local commissions and task forces on policing innovation to reimagine how public safety could work in a truly equitable and just way in each community.


 

 

 

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Working Across the Aisle



Working across the aisle, the Judiciary Committee passed many bipartisan bills, including several that have become law, such as legislation delivering billions of dollars in savings to consumers by increasing access to generic prescription drugs, providing greater fairness in the bankruptcy system, fully funding the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund, and enhancing protections for servicemembers, veterans, and first responders. 

Here are the bipartisan bills that have become law:

  • H.R. 965, the “Creating and Restoring Equal Access to Equivalent Samples (CREATES) Act of 2019” [Marked Up, Passed House, LAW]  
  • H.R. 3311, the “Small Business Reorganization Act of 2019” [Marked Up, Passed House, LAW]
  • H.R. 3304, the “National Guard and Reservists Debt Relief Extension Act of 2019” [Marked Up, Passed House, LAW]
  • H.R. 2938, the “Honoring American Veterans in Extreme Need (HAVEN) Act of 2019” [Marked Up, Passed House, LAW]
  • H.R. 2336, the “Family Farmer Relief Act of 2019” [Marked Up, Passed House, LAW]
  • H.R. 1327, the “Never Forget the Heroes: James Zadroga, Ray Pfeifer, and Luis Alvarez Permanent Authorization of the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund Act” [Marked Up, Passed House, LAW]
  • H.R. 2368/S. 998, the “Supporting and Treating Officers in Crisis (STOIC) Act of 2019” [Marked Up, Passed House, LAW]  
  • H.R. 4258, the “Reauthorizing Security for Supreme Court Justices Act of 2019” [Marked Up, Passed House, LAW]
  • H.R. 1986/S. 744, the “Effective Prosecution of Possession of Biological Toxins and Agents Act of 2019” [Marked Up, Passed House, LAW] 
  • H.R. 886, the “Veteran Treatment Court Coordination Act of 2019” [Marked Up, Passed House, LAW]
  • H.R. 5140, the “Satellite Television Community Protection and Promotion Act of 2019” [Marked Up, Passed House, LAW] 
  • H.R. 1123, the “Divisional Realignment for the Eastern District of Arkansas Act of 2019” [Marked Up, Passed House, LAW]
  • H.R. 1569, To amend title 28, United States Code, to add Flagstaff and Yuma to the list of locations in which court shall be held in the judicial district for the State of Arizona. [Marked Up, Passed House, LAW]
  • H.R. 439, the “National FFA Organization's Federal Charter Amendments Act” [Passed House, LAW]
  • H.R. 724, the “Preventing Animal Cruelty and Torture Act” [Passed House, LAW]
  • H.R. 777, the “Debbie Smith Reauthorization Act of 2019” [Passed House, LAW] 
  • H.R. 1579/S. 693, the “National POW/MIA Flag Act” [Passed House, LAW] 
  • H.R. 1636/S. 2163, the “Commission on the Social Status of Black Men and Boys Act” [Passed House, LAW]  
  • H.R. 1641/S. 504, the “Let Everyone Get Involved in Opportunities for National Service (LEGIONS) Act” [Passed House, LAW] 
  • H.R. 2379, To reauthorize the Bulletproof Vest Partnership Grant Program. [Passed House, LAW]
  • H.R. 2438/S. 982, the “Not Invisible Act of 2019” [Marked Up, Passed House, LAW]
  • H.R. 2733/S. 227, the “Savanna’s Act” [Marked Up, Passed House, LAW]
  • H.R. 3238/S. 1321, the "Defending the Integrity of Voting Systems Act" [Passed House, LAW]
  • H.R. 3735/S. 2746, the "Law Enforcement Suicide Data Collection Act" [Passed House, LAW]  
  • H.R. 4803, the “Citizenship for Children of Military Members and Civil Servants Act” [Passed House, LAW]
  • H.R. 5128, the “Saudi Fugitive Declassification Act of 2019” [Passed House, LAW] 
  • H.R. 5277, To amend section 442 of title 18, United States Code, to exempt certain interests in mutual funds, unit investment trusts, employee benefit plans, and retirement plans from conflict of interest limitations for the Government Publishing Office. [Passed House, LAW]
  • H.R. 6509, the “Public Safety Officer Pandemic Response Act of 2020”/ S. 3607, the “Safeguarding America's First Responders Act of 2020” [Passed House, LAW]
  • H.R. 7881/S. 2330, the "Empowering Olympic, Paralympic, and Amateur Athletes Act of 2020" [Passed House, LAW] 
  • S. 1380, the "Due Process Protections Act" [Passed House, LAW]
     

 

 

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Bipartisan Investigations



In a bipartisan fashion, the Committee began an examination of various industries to ensure a fair and competitive marketplace for consumers, including the Committee’s bipartisan antitrust investigation into competition in digital markets. In October 2020, the Majority Staff of the Antitrust Subcommittee released the findings of its more than 16-month long investigation into the state of competition in the digital economy in a more than 400-page report entitled “Investigation of Competition in the Digital Marketplace: Majority Staff Report and Recommendations.”

  • Hearing: The State of Competition in the Wireless Market: Examining the Impact of the Proposed Merger of T-Mobile and Sprint on Consumers, Workers, and the Internet 
  • Hearing: Diagnosing the Problem: Exploring the Effects of Consolidation and Anticompetitive Conduct in Health Care Markets
  • Hearing: Antitrust and Economic Opportunity: Competition in Labor Markets
  • Hearing: Online Platforms and Market Power, Part 1: The Free and Diverse Press
  • Hearing: Online Platforms and Market Power, Part 2: Innovation and Entrepreneurship
  • Hearing: Online Platforms and Market Power, Part 3: The Role of Data and Privacy in Competition
  • Hearing: Online Platforms and Market Power, Part 4: Perspectives of the Antitrust Agencies
  • Field Hearing: Online Platforms and Market Power, Part 5: Competitors in the Digital Economy
  • Hearing: Online Platforms and Market Power, Part 6: Examining the Dominance of Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google
  • Hearing: Proposals to Strengthen the Antitrust Laws and Restore Competition Online

Spotlight: As part of the Committee’s bipartisan antitrust investigation into competition in digital markets, for the first time ever the CEOs of the four largest technology companies—Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google—testified in Congress at the same time, in front of the Antitrust Subcommittee. Committee members examined the business practices of these companies and the dominant role that they play in the economy and in our society.



 

 

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Protecting Americans from Gun Violence



The Judiciary Committee led the charge this Congress to pass commonsense gun violence prevention measures that are supported by a majority of Americans. These include requiring background checks on all sales of firearms and providing a means to keep guns out of the hands of individuals who pose an imminent danger to themselves or others. 

  • H.R. 8, the “Bipartisan Background Checks Act of 2019” [Marked Up, Passed House]
  • H.R. 1112, the “Enhanced Background Checks Act of 2019” [Marked Up, Passed House]
  • H.R. 1236, the “Extreme Risk Protection Order Act of 2019” [Marked Up]
  • H.R. 1186, the “Keep Americans Safe Act” [Marked Up]
  • H.R. 2708, the “Disarm Hate Act” [Marked Up]
  • Hearing: Preventing Gun Violence: A Call to Action
  • Hearing: Protecting America from Assault Weapons
  • Hearing: Community Responses to Gun Violence in our Cities

Spotlight: In addition to passing historic legislation, the Committee also held hearings to obtain first-hand testimony from gun violence survivors, gun violence prevention advocates, and other experts in the field. These hearings not only examined the horrifying epidemic of mass shootings, but also the daily toll of gun violence impacting many of America’s communities, as well as the specific risks posed by assault weapons.



 

 

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Supporting First Responders, Law Enforcement, Servicemembers, and Veterans



Whether it’s potentially drastic cuts to compensation for 9/11 victims and first responders, barriers to mental health services, or challenges to achieving financial stability, too often our first responders, members of law enforcement, servicemembers, and veterans face hurdles to the services they have earned after serving our country and its citizens. In response to these challenges, the Judiciary Committee passed several bipartisan bills that have become law, such as legislation to fully fund and extend the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund for first responders and the residents and workers of Lower Manhattan who developed 9/11-related illnesses.

The Committee also enacted bipartisan legislation to protect servicemembers and veterans who declare bankruptcy, to ensure fairness for veterans who enter the criminal justice system, to track suicides within law enforcement agencies, to facilitate citizenship for children of servicemembers residing abroad, and to provide mental health services to members of law enforcement.

  • H.R. 1327, the “Never Forget the Heroes: James Zadroga, Ray Pfeifer, and Luis Alvarez Permanent Authorization of the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund Act” [Marked Up, Passed House, LAW]
  • H.R. 2368/S. 998, the “Supporting and Treating Officers in Crisis (STOIC) Act of 2019” [Marked Up, Passed House, LAW] 
  • H.R. 2938, the “Honoring American Veterans in Extreme Need Act (HAVEN) Act” [Marked Up, Passed House, LAW]
  • H.R. 3304, the “National Guard and Reservists Debt Relief Extension Act of 2019” [Marked Up, Passed House, LAW]
  • H.R. 2379, To reauthorize the Bulletproof Vest Partnership Grant Program. [Passed House, LAW]
  • H.R. 4803, the “Citizenship for Children of Military Members and Civil Servants Act” [Passed House, LAW]
  • H.R. 1579/S. 693, the “National POW/MIA Flag Act” [Passed House, LAW] 
  • H.R. 1641/S. 504, the “Let Everyone Get Involved in Opportunities for National Service (LEGIONS) Act” [Passed House, LAW] 
  • H.R. 3735/S. 2746, the “Law Enforcement Suicide Data Collection Act” [Passed House, LAW] 
  • H.R. 886, the “Veteran Treatment Court Coordination Act of 2019” [Marked Up, Passed House, LAW]
  • H.R. 6509, the “Public Safety Officer Pandemic Response Act of 2020”/ S. 3607, the “Safeguarding America's First Responders Act of 2020” [Passed House, LAW] 
  • H.R. 450, the “Preventing Crimes Against Veterans Act” of 2019 [Passed House]
  • H.R. 8354, the "Servicemembers and Veterans Initiative Act of 2020" [Marked Up]
  • Hearing: The Need to Reauthorize the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund
  • Hearing: The Impact of Current Immigration Policies on Service Members and Veterans, and their Families

Remembering a hero: On June 11, Luis Alvarez, a retired New York City Police Detective and 9/11 first responder testified before the House Judiciary Committee in support of reauthorizing the Victim Compensation Fund. Tragically, 18 days later, he passed away from liver cancer, which he developed as a result of working for three months at the World Trade Center site, searching for survivors and the remains of 9/11 victims. We honor his memory by continuing to fight and advocate for American heroes like Detective Alvarez.


 

 

 

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Reducing the Cost of Prescription Drugs and Health Care



Too many Americans cannot afford their prescription drugs, with some having to decide between prescription medicine and putting food on their kitchen table. No one should ever be forced to choose between feeding their family and obtaining critical medical care. The Judiciary Committee passed several bipartisan bills targeting abusive tactics that delay access to cheaper generic alternatives for prescription drugs and examined the effects of consolidation and anticompetitive conduct in health care markets, including prescription drug markets.

  • H.R. 965, the “Creating and Restoring Equal Access to Equivalent Samples (CREATES) Act of 2019” [Marked Up, Passed House, LAW] 
  • H.R. 2374, the “Stop Significant and Time-wasting Abuse Limiting Legitimate Innovation of New Generics (Stop STALLING) Act” [Marked Up]
  • H.R. 2375, the “Preserve Access to Affordable Generics and Biosimilars Act” [Marked Up]
  • H.R. 2376, the “Prescription Pricing for the People Act of 2019” [Marked Up]
  • H.R. 3991, the “Affordable Prescriptions for Patients Through Improvements to Patent Litigation Act of 2019” [Marked Up, Passed House]
  • H.R. 5133, the “Affordable Prescriptions for Patients Through Promoting Competition Act of 2019” [Marked Up, Passed House]
  • H.R. 1418, the "Competitive Health Insurance Reform Act of 2019" [Passed House]
  • Hearing: Diagnosing the Problem: Exploring the Effects of Consolidation and Anticompetitive Conduct in Health Care Markets

Spotlight: H.R. 965, the “Creating and Restoring Equal Access to Equivalent Samples (CREATES) Act of 2019,” would crack down on gamesmanship by branded drug companies that keep generic drug companies from developing cheaper alternatives. It is estimated that the bill, which was signed into law as part of the end of year appropriations bill, will save consumers at least $3.7 billion over ten years.


 

 

 

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Protecting Consumers



The United States has seen a decades-long trend toward greater concentration of power in the hands of large corporations. Too often, this results in higher prices, lower quality of products, and fewer choices for consumers. The Committee examined the state of competition in the health care and wireless markets and launched a special bipartisan investigation into the digital technology industry to determine how these companies have used their market power and how consumers and workers have been affected by growing concentrations of power.

The Committee also considered legislation to subject oil cartels, which raise gas prices for consumers, to antitrust liability and legislation to prohibit forced arbitration provisions, which deprive consumers of their right to access the courts when they have a dispute with a company. Other legislation included measures to protect children from dangerous e-cigarettes and to combat doping in international sports competitions.

  • H.R. 1423, the “Forced Arbitration Injustice Repeal (FAIR) Act” [Marked Up, Passed House]
  • H.R. 3942, the “Preventing Online Sales of E-Cigarettes to Children Act” [Marked Up, Passed House]
  • H.R. 835, the “Rodchenkov Anti-Doping Act of 2019” [Marked Up, Passed House]
  • H.R. 7036, the “Antitrust Criminal Penalty Enhancement and Reform Permanent Extension Act” [Passed House]
  • H.R. 948, the “No Oil Producing and Exporting Cartels Act of 2019 (NOPEC)” [Marked Up]
  • Hearing: The State of Competition in the Wireless Market: Examining the Impact of the Proposed Merger of T-Mobile and Sprint on Consumers, Workers, and the Internet 
  • Hearing: Diagnosing the Problem: Exploring the Effects of Consolidation and Anticompetitive Conduct in Health Care Markets
  • Hearing: Justice Denied: Forced Arbitration and the Erosion of our Legal System
  • Hearing: Online Platforms and Market Power, Part 1: The Free and Diverse Press
  • Hearing: Online Platforms and Market Power, Part 2: Innovation and Entrepreneurship
  • Hearing: Online Platforms and Market Power, Part 3: The Role of Data and Privacy in Competition
  • Hearing: Online Platforms and Market Power, Part 4: Perspectives of the Antitrust Agencies
  • Hearing: Antitrust and Economic Opportunity: Competition in Labor Markets
  • Field Hearing: Online Platforms and Market Power, Part 5: Competitors in the Digital Economy
  • Hearing: Online Platforms and Market Power, Part 6: Examining the Dominance of Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google
  • Hearing: Proposals to Strengthen the Antitrust Laws and Restore Competition Online

Spotlight: Many businesses use forced arbitration clauses, buried deep in the fine print of take-it-or-leave-it consumer contracts for everyday products such as cell phones, credit cards and home mortgages. Forced arbitration enables companies to evade the court system, where plaintiffs have far greater legal protections, and hide behind a one-sided process that is tilted in their favor. H.R. 1423, the “Forced Arbitration Injustice Repeal (FAIR) Act,” which passed the Committee and the House of Representatives with bipartisan support, would prohibit forced arbitration in consumer, employment, civil rights, and antitrust disputes. This important legislation preserves a bedrock principle in this country: that all Americans deserve their day in court.


 

 

 

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Protecting the Rights of All Communities



No one should face discrimination or violence because of who they are, but when they do, Congress must ensure that they have avenues for recourse and access to resources. The Judiciary Committee passed several pieces of legislation to protect communities that have historically faced discrimination, including the first bill ever to pass the Committee and the House to provide explicit comprehensive non-discrimination protections for the LGBTQ community, legislation that would finally make lynching a federal crime, comprehensive policing reform legislation, legislation to ban discrimination based on natural hairstyles, legislation to prevent domestic terrorism by white supremacists and other far-right extremists, and bills to combat violent crime against Native Americans, including a bill to address the crisis of missing and murdered Native Americans. The Committee also held hearings on hate crimes and the rise of white nationalism, as well as the history of slavery and racial discrimination in America, their continuing impact, and potential remedies for affected communities. 

In addition, racial and religious minorities continue to be the target of bigotry and hatred throughout the United States, which has all too often ended in violence and fear within minority communities. Unfortunately, even Members of Congress are not immune from racist attacks, some of which emanate directly from the White House. The Judiciary Committee led the House in standing up to racist, nativist, and anti-Semitic sentiment. 

 
  • H.R. 1636/S. 2163, the “Commission on the Social Status of Black Men and Boys Act” [Passed House, LAW]
  • H.R. 5, the “Equality Act” [Marked Up, Passed House]
  • H.R. 35, the “Emmett Till Antilynching Act” [Marked Up, Passed House]
  • H.R. 677, the “21st Century President Act” [Marked Up, Passed House]
  • H.R. 7120, the “George Floyd Justice in Policing Act of 2020” [Marked Up, Passed House]
  • H.R. 3545, the "National Opposition to Hate, Assault, and Threats to Equality (NO HATE) Act of 2019" [Passed House]
  • H.R. 5602, the “Domestic Terrorism Prevention Act of 2020” [Marked Up, Passed House]
  • H.R. 2438/S. 982, the “Not Invisible Act of 2019” [Marked Up, Passed House, Law]
  • H.R. 2733/S. 227, the “Savanna’s Act” [Marked Up, Passed House, LAW]
  • H.R. 5309, the "Creating a Respectful and Open World for Natural Hair (CROWN) Act of 2020" [Marked Up, Passed House]
  • H.R. 7881/S. 2330, the "Empowering Olympic, Paralympic, and Amateur Athletes Act of 2020" [Passed House, LAW]
  • H. Res. 489, Condemning President Trump’s racist comments directed at Members of Congress. [Passed House]
  • H. Res. 183, Condemning anti-Semitism as hateful expressions of intolerance that are contradictory to the values and aspirations that define the people of the United States and condemning anti-Muslim discrimination and bigotry against minorities as hateful expressions of intolerance that are contrary to the values and aspirations of the United States. [Passed House]
  • H. Res. 41, Rejecting White nationalism and White supremacy. [Passed House]
  • H. Res. 694, Recognizing the importance of the Civil Rights Act of 1866 and the laws derived therefrom. [Marked Up]
  • H. Res. 908, Condemning all forms of anti-Asian sentiment as related to COVID-19. [Passed House]
  • H. Res. 1154, Condemning QAnon and rejecting the conspiracy theories it promotes. [Passed House]
  • Hearing: H.R. 5, the “Equality Act"
  • Hearing: H.R. 40 and the Path to Restorative Justice
  • Hearing: Hate Crimes and the Rise of White Nationalism
  • Hearing: Oversight Hearing on Policing Practices (2019)
  • Hearing: Oversight Hearing on Policing Practices and Law Enforcement Accountability (2020)
  • Hearing: Oversight of the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice
  • Hearing: Diversity in America: The Representation of People of Color in the Media
     

Spotlight: For nearly a century, violent and gruesome lynchings were used to enforce racial subordination and to terrorize African American communities. Yet, often the perpetrators of these violent acts of terror were never held accountable, and the federal government has never specifically outlawed lynching. To correct this historical injustice, the Committee passed H.R. 35, the “Emmett Till Antilynching Act,” to specify lynching as a hate crime under federal law.



 

 

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Standing Up for Women



Despite important protections in current law, women continue to face significant discrimination in American society, including unequal pay, failures to accommodate pregnancy, and restrictions on a woman’s ability to make her own health care decisions. That is why the Judiciary Committee acted to remove the deadline for ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment, which would finally enshrine in the text of the Constitution nondiscrimination protections on the basis of sex. The Committee also passed reauthorization of the landmark Violence Against Women Act and examined the ongoing assault against reproductive freedom by the Trump Administration and various states across the country.

  • H.R. 777, the “Debbie Smith Reauthorization Act of 2019” [Passed House, LAW] 
  • H.R. 1585, the “Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2019” [Marked Up, Passed House]
  • H.R. 6100, the “Strengthening the Opposition to Female Genital Mutilation (STOP FGM) Act of 2020” [Marked Up, Passed House]
  • H.R. 7718, the "Protecting the Health and Wellness of Babies and Pregnant Women in Custody Act" [Marked Up, Passed House]
  • H. J. Res. 79, Removing the deadline for the ratification of the equal rights amendment. [Marked Up, Passed House]
  • H. Res. 354, Celebrating the 100th anniversary of the passage and ratification of the 19th Amendment, providing for women’s suffrage, to the Constitution of the United States. [Passed House]
  • Hearing: Equal Rights Amendment
  • Hearing: Threats to Reproductive Rights in America
  • Hearing: Reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act 
  • Hearing: Women and Girls in the Criminal Justice System

Spotlight: Although the Republican-controlled Senate has refused to take up reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act, one critical provision of that legislation did become law. The “Debbie Smith Reauthorization Act” authorizes funding to end the backlog of untested and unanalyzed DNA samples, including rape kits, which help identify the perpetrators of sexual assault.


 

 

 

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Protecting the Right to Vote and Securing America’s Elections



The right to vote is the foundation of our democracy, but for too long this right was denied to African Americans and other racial minorities. The Voting Rights Act of 1965 (VRA) was landmark legislation that helped ensure that African Americans and other people of color could access this right. However, the Supreme Court struck down portions of the VRA in 2013, leaving American voters vulnerable to tactics of voter suppression and discrimination. 

Under Republican leadership, the Committee did nothing to address this gutting of the VRA and the slew of bills and other actions to suppress the vote that many states adopted in its wake. In 2019, under Democratic leadership, the Committee held a series of hearings on barriers to voting, continuing evidence of voting discrimination, and Congress's legal authority to act. The Committee and the House then passed legislation to restore key provisions of the VRA and to bolster its guarantee against voting discrimination by states and localities on the basis of race, color, or language-minority status.

The right to vote can lose its significance if American elections are not secure and can be hacked by domestic or foreign adversaries. That is why the Committee also held several hearings on securing America’s elections, including oversight of the government agencies working to secure our elections from domestic and foreign threats. 

In addition, the COVID-19 pandemic posed significant risks to the ability to vote safely in November. That is why the committee held a hearing on protecting the right to vote during the pandemic and worked with other committees to secure important election provisions in both the CARES and HEROES Acts.

  • H.R. 4, the “John R. Lewis Voting Rights Act of 2020” [Marked Up, Passed House] 
  • H.R. 3238/S. 1321, the "Defending the Integrity of Voting Systems Act" [Passed House, LAW]
  • Hearing: H.R. 1, the “For the People Act of 2019”
  • Hearing: History and Enforcement of the Voting Rights Act of 1965
  • Hearing: Enforcement of the Voting Rights Act in the State of Texas
  • Hearing: Continuing Challenges to the Voting Rights Act Since Shelby County v. Holder
  • Hearing: Discriminatory Barriers to Voting
  • Hearing: Evidence of Current and Ongoing Voting Discrimination
  • Hearing: Congressional Authority to Protect Voting Rights After Shelby County v. Holder
  • Hearing: Legislative Proposals to Strengthen the Voting Rights Act
  • Hearing: Securing America’s Elections
  • Hearing: Securing America’s Elections Part II: Oversight of Government Agencies
  • Hearing: Protecting the Right to Vote During the COVID-19 Pandemic
  • Hearing: Citizens United at 10: The Consequences for Democracy and Potential Responses by Congress

Spotlight: The Judiciary Committee’s first hearing after Democrats assumed the Majority was on H.R. 1, the “For the People Act.” H.R. 1 is comprehensive legislation that strengthens voting, campaign finance, lobbying, and government ethics laws in numerous ways to renew our nation’s commitment to government “of the people, by the people, and for the people.” This legislation also incorporates the “Democracy Restoration Act of 2019,” which would restore federal voting rights for citizens with felony convictions. Ex-offender disenfranchisement is wrong and anti-democratic in and of itself, and many of these laws also have a particularly disproportionate impact on communities of color.


 

 

 

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Providing a Check on Executive Power



Whether it is declaring a phony national emergency so that the President can build a wall without authorization from Congress or dramatically expanding the use of executive privilege to conceal information from Congress, the Trump Administration has asserted unprecedented power that threatens to undermine the separation of powers that is so integral to our constitutional system. The President has also issued a number of questionable pardons without undertaking the rigorous review process employed by previous presidents, and the Attorney General has taken numerous actions that have put the independence of the Department of Justice into question. That is why the Judiciary Committee launched an investigation into political interference at the Department of Justice and held a series of hearings to shed light on the Trump Administration’s disturbing use of its executive power and to highlight political interference at the Department of Justice and threats to prosecutorial independence. In addition, in the wake of racial justice protests throughout the country, the Judiciary Committee, in conjunction with other committees, demanded that the Inspectors General of the Department of Justice and Department of Homeland Security open an immediate investigation into the Trump Administration's use of violent tactics against peaceful protestors in Washington D.C., Portland, Oregon, and elsewhere around the country.

The Committee also held a hearing on oversight of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) to determine appropriate reforms to the government’s secret surveillance powers. This hearing helped inform the drafting of the USA FREEDOM Reauthorization Act of 2020, which included significant reforms to the FISA process.

  • H.R. 6172, the “USA FREEDOM Reauthorization Act of 2020” [Passed House]
  • H.R. 2678, the “No President is Above the Law Act” [Marked Up]
  • H.R. 7694, the “Abuse of the Pardon Prevention Act” [Marked Up]
  • H. Res. 1155, Reaffirming the House of Representatives’ commitment to the orderly and peaceful transfer of power called for in the Constitution of the United States, and for other purposes. [Passed House]
  • Hearing: The National Emergencies Act of 1976
  • Hearing: Examining the Constitutional Role of the Pardon Power 
  • Hearing: Presidential Clemency and Opportunities for Reform
  • Hearing: Executive Privilege and Congressional Oversight
  • Hearing: Oversight of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act
  • Hearing: Oversight of the Federal Bureau of Investigation
  • Hearing: Oversight of the Department of Justice: Political Interference and Threats to Prosecutorial Independence
  • Hearing: Oversight of the Department of Justice
  • Hearing: Oversight of the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice

Spotlight: The Trump Administration has broken societal norms that threaten the fabric of our democracy by engaging in conduct that was once unthinkable. This conduct has been aided by the Attorney General’s failure to protect the Department of Justice from political interference and the personal interests of the President, as illustrated in the Committee’s oversight hearings of the Department of Justice. In response, the Committee took strong action to close dangerous loopholes revealed by the President’s actions. The No President is Above the Law Act would suspend the statute of limitations for any federal offense committed by a sitting president, whether it was committed before or during the president’s term of office. This legislation would ensure that the presidency is not a get-out-of-jail-free card. The Abuse of the Pardon Prevention Act would require much-needed transparency if the President issues a pardon or commutation in circumstances that may involve corrupt self-dealing, or if the President issues clemency for an offense that undermines the integrity of Congress’s own proceedings. It also reaffirms and makes explicit that abuse of the pardon power can constitute a criminal offense under the federal anti-bribery law and that a president may not pardon him or herself.


 

 

 

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Providing for a Just and Humane Immigration System



The Trump Administration has launched an unprecedented assault on immigrants through the implementation of a variety of nativist, discriminatory policies. Many of these policies restrict or otherwise discourage legal immigration and run contrary to our legacy as a nation of refuge. The Judiciary Committee has conducted vigorous oversight over these cruel and inhumane policies, including launching an investigation into the Trump Administration’s “zero tolerance” or family separation policy, and has passed a series of bills that would provide for a more rational and just immigration system. 

Among the immigration reform bills taken up by the Committee was legislation to provide permanent protection for Dreamers and individuals with temporary protected status, to establish humanitarian standards for people in the custody of U.S. Customs and Border Protection, to shore up the agricultural sector by creating a path for lawful status for undocumented farmworkers and modernizing the H-2A temporary agricultural worker visa program, and to end the President’s Muslim Ban. The Committee also held hearings on the Trump Administration’s cruel family separation policy, the Muslim Ban, and the impact of the Administration’s immigration policies on service members, veterans, and their families.

  • H.R. 4803, the “Citizenship for Children of Military Members and Civil Servants Act” [Passed House, LAW]
  • H.R. 2820, the “Dream Act of 2019” [Marked Up, Passed House] 
  • H.R. 2821, the “American Promise Act of 2019” [Marked Up, Passed House] 
  • H.R. 549, the “Venezuela TPS Act of 2019” [Marked Up, Passed House]
  • H.R. 3239, the “Humanitarian Standards for Individuals in Customs and Border Protection Custody Act” [Marked Up, Passed House]
  • H.R. 565, the “Advancing Mutual Interests and Growing Our Success (AMIGOS) Act” [Marked Up, Passed House]
  • H.R. 5038, the “Farm Workforce Modernization Act of 2019” [Marked Up, Passed House]
  • H.R. 1044, the “Fairness for High-Skilled Immigrants Act of 2019” [Passed House]
  • H.R. 1548, For the relief of Maria Carmen Castro Ramirez and J. Refugio Carreno Rojas. [Marked Up, Passed House]
  • H.R. 2214, the “National Origin-Based Antidiscrimination for Nonimmigrants (NO BAN) Act” [Marked Up, Passed House] 
  • H.R. 2877, To add Ireland to the E-3 nonimmigrant visa program. [Passed House]
  • H.R. 5581, the “Access to Counsel Act of 2020” [Marked Up, Passed House] 
  • H.R. 8089, the “Emergency Stopgap USCIS Stabilization Act” [Passed House]
  • H.R. 631, For the relief of Arpita Kurdekar, Girish Kurdekar, and Vandana Kurdekar. [Marked Up]
  • H.R. 4225, For the relief of Maria Isabel Bueso Barrera, Alberto Bueso Mendoza, Karla Maria Barrera De Bueso, and Ana Lucia Bueso Barrera. [Marked Up]
  • H.R. 7146, For the relief of Victoria Galindo Lopez. [Marked Up]
  • H.R. 7572, For the relief of Median El-Moustrah. [Marked Up]
  • H.R. 8225, the "Fight Notario Fraud Act of 2020" [Marked Up, Passed House]
  • H. Res. 1153, Condemning unwanted, unnecessary medical procedures on individuals without their full, informed consent. [Passed House]
  • Hearing: Protecting Dreamers and TPS Recipients
  • Hearing: Oversight of the Trump Administration’s Family Separation Policy
  • Hearing: Overcrowding and Prolonged Detention at CBP Facilities
  • Hearing: Policy Changes and Processing Delays at U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services
  • Hearing: Oversight of Family Separation and U.S. Customs and Border Protection Short-Term Custody Under the Trump Administration
  • Hearing: Oversight of the Trump Administration’s Border Policies and the Relationship Between Anti-Immigrant Rhetoric and Domestic Terrorism
  • Hearing: Oversight of the Trump Administration’s Muslim Ban
  • Hearing: The Expansion and Troubling Use of ICE Detention
  • Hearing: The Impact of Current Immigration Policies on Service Members and Veterans, and their Families
  • Hearing: Securing the Future of American Agriculture
  • Hearing: Courts in Crisis: The State of Judicial Independence and Due Process in U.S. Immigration Courts
  • Hearing: The Current State of the U.S. Refugee Program
  • Hearing: Oversight of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services
  • Hearing: Immigrants as Essential Workers During COVID-19

Spotlight: The Committee held a hearing shining a light on a variety of immigration policies that have had a particularly devastating impact on non-citizen servicemembers and veterans. The House also passed bipartisan legislation, introduced by Chairman Nadler and then-Ranking Member Collins, the “Citizenship for Children of Military Members and Civil Servants Act,” to reverse a Trump Administration policy that made it harder for the children born to parents serving overseas to acquire citizenship. This bill then passed the Senate and was signed into law.


 

 

 

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Strengthening the Nation’s Bankruptcy System



The Bankruptcy Code, either directly or indirectly, affects millions of Americans, and all types of businesses, from the largest to the smallest. When it works properly, it offers a second chance to individuals and businesses in financial distress. But various reforms are necessary to ensure that it reaches its full potential. The Committee passed several bills to remove unnecessary hurdles and unfairness from the bankruptcy laws, particularly for small businesses, family farmers, Americans with student loan debt, employees, homeowners, veterans, and certain servicemembers. The Committee also worked to include critical bankruptcy protections for individuals and small businesses in Congress’ responses to the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • H.R. 3311, the “Small Business Reorganization Act of 2019” [Marked Up, Passed House, LAW]
  • H.R. 3304, the “National Guard and Reservists Debt Relief Extension Act of 2019” [MarkedUp, Passed House, LAW]
  • H.R. 2938, the “Honoring American Veterans in Extreme Need (HAVEN) Act of 2019” [Marked Up, Passed House, LAW]
  • H.R. 2336, the “Family Farmer Relief Act of 2019” [Marked Up, Passed House, LAW]
  • H.R. 683, the "Puerto Rico Recovery Accuracy in Disclosures Act of 2019 (PRRADA)" [Marked Up]
  • H.R. 7370, the "Protecting Employees and Retirees in Business Bankruptcies Act of 2020" [Marked Up]
  • H.R. 2648, the "Student Borrower Bankruptcy Relief Act of 2020" [Marked Up]
  • H.R. 8366, the "Protecting Homeowners in Bankruptcy Act of 2020" [Marked Up, Passed House]
  • Hearing: Oversight of Bankruptcy Law and Legislative Proposals

Spotlight: One important focus of the Committee’s hearing on proposals to reform the bankruptcy laws was on the manifest unfairness that student loans—unlike every other similar kind of debt, such as credit cards or auto loans—are effectively immune from bankruptcy and cannot be erased. There is no reason that this one category of debt—which is often the result of predatory lending that disproportionately affects minorities—should be singled out for special treatment that makes relief under the bankruptcy code virtually impossible. That is why Chairman Nadler has introduced H.R. 2648, the “Student Borrower Bankruptcy Relief Act of 2019,” which would provide fairness for student borrowers.


 

 

 

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Ensuring a Strong Intellectual Property System



Thanks to our strong intellectual property system, the United States is a world leader in innovation and creativity, which is a key driver of economic growth. The Committee conducted oversight of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and the U.S. Copyright Office to ensure that they are administering a system that is fair and efficient for all innovators, entrepreneurs, creators, and users of intellectual property and passed legislation to modernize U.S. trademark law. The Committee also examined the lack of diversity among patentholders and passed legislation to ensure that small creators are able to protect their copyrighted work from infringement. In addition, the Committee worked to include provisions in the CARES Act to provide needed flexibility to the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and the Copyright Office to ensure that the intellectual property system remains strong and secure during the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • H.R. 5140, the “Satellite Television Community Protection and Promotion Act of 2019” [Marked Up, Passed House, LAW] 
  • H.R. 2426, the “Copyright Alternative in Small-Claims Enforcement (CASE) Act of 2019” [Marked Up, Passed House]
  • H.R. 3991, the “Affordable Prescriptions for Patients Through Improvements to Patent Litigation Act of 2019” [Marked Up, Passed House]
  • H.R. 7259, the “Patents for Humanity Program Improvement Act” [Passed House]
  • H.R. 6196, the "Trademark Modernization Act (TM Act) of 2020" [Marked Up]
  • Hearing: Lost Einsteins: Lack of Diversity in Patent Inventorship and the Impact on America’s Innovation Economy  
  • Hearing: The Patent Trial and Appeal Board and the Appointments Clause: Implications of Recent Court Decisions
  • Hearing: Counterfeits and Cluttering: Emerging Threats to the Integrity of the Trademark System and the Impact on American Consumers and Businesses
  • Hearing: Oversight of the U.S. Copyright Office
  • Hearing: Oversight of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office
  • Hearing: Copyright and the Internet in 2020: Reactions to the Copyright Office's Report on the Efficacy of 17 U.S.C. 512 After Two Decades

Spotlight: A fundamental principle of the American legal system is that every right must have a remedy, but today, many small creators, especially visual artists, are unable to protect their rights because the cost of pursuing an infringement claim in federal court is far greater—as much as ten times or more—than the damages they could ever hope to receive. That is why the Committee and the House passed H.R. 2426, the “Copyright Alternative in Small-Claims Enforcement Act of 2019” or the “CASE Act of 2019.” This important bipartisan legislation would establish a voluntary small claims court within the Copyright Office to hear copyright suits seeking $30,000 or less in total damages.


 

 

 

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Keeping Americans Safe and Reforming our Criminal Justice System



Last Congress, with passage of the bipartisan First Step Act, important progress was made in reforming our criminal justice system, but additional action is needed to address our crisis of mass incarceration and disparities within the justice system based on race and wealth. This Congress, the Committee heard testimony on a variety of topics that will help inform its work to enact further reforms to address issues such as the bail system, policing practices, treatment of women and girls in the criminal justice system, and federal marijuana laws. The Committee also led passage through the House of important bills to refine the First Step Act, reform policing practices, crack down on animal cruelty, support victims of human trafficking, reauthorize juvenile justice programs, and develop anti-bullying programs.

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Committee advocated for provisions in the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, which was signed into law on March 27th, to provide funding to protect the health of individuals who are incarcerated and other related provisions and funding to support public safety officers. In addition, the HEROES Act included many priorities for the Judiciary Committee, including funding for testing, treatment, and prevention of COVID–19 in prisons and jails; additional funding for the Violence Against Women Act to address the surge in domestic violence; and funding for Legal Aid and local law enforcement.

  • H.R. 1986/S. 744, the “Effective Prosecution of Possession of Biological Toxins and Agents Act of 2019” [Marked Up, Passed House, LAW] 
  • H.R. 724, the “Preventing Animal Cruelty and Torture Act” [Passed House, LAW]
  • H.R. 4018, To provide that the amount of time that an elderly offender must serve before being eligible for placement in home detention is to be reduced by the amount of good time credits earned by the prisoner, and for other purposes. [Marked Up, Passed House]
  • H.R. 494, the “Tiffany Joslyn Juvenile Accountability Block Grant Reauthorization and Bullying Prevention and Intervention Act of 2019” [Passed House]
  • H.R. 507, the “Put Trafficking Victims First Act of 2019” [Passed House]
  • H.R. 450, the “Preventing Crimes Against Veterans Act of 2019” [Passed House]
  • H.R. 7120, the “George Floyd Justice in Policing Act of 2020” [Marked Up, Passed House]
  • H.R. 5546, the “Effective Assistance of Counsel in the Digital Era Act” [Marked Up, Passed House]  
  • H.R. 6400, the “Emergency Community Supervision Act” [Passed House]
  • H.R. 6414, the “COVID-19 Correctional Facility Emergency Response Act of 2020” [Passed House]  
  • H.R. 3884, the “Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement (MORE) Act of 2019” [Marked Up]
  • H.R. 7636, the "Custodial Interrogation Recording Act" [Marked Up]
  • H.R. 8169, the "Elder Abuse Protection Act of 2020" [Marked Up]
  • H.R. 8161, the "One Stop Shop Community Reentry Program Act of 2020" [Marked Up]
  • H.R. 5053, the "Justice for Juveniles Act" [Marked Up, Passed House]
  • H.R. 8124, the "Criminal Judicial Administration Act of 2020" [Marked Up, Passed House]
  • H.R. 8225, the "Fight Notario Fraud Act of 2020" [Marked Up, Passed House]
  • H.R. 6813, the "Promoting Alzheimer's Awareness to Prevent Elder Abuse Act" [Marked Up, Passed House]
  • H.R. 7718, the "Protecting the Health and Wellness of Babies and Pregnant Women in Custody Act" [Marked Up, Passed House]
  • S. 1380, the "Due Process Protections Act" [Passed House, LAW]
  • Hearing: Marijuana Laws in America: Racial Justice and the Need for Reform
  • Hearing: California Criminal Justice System Reform: Potential Lessons for the Nation
  • Hearing: Women and Girls in the Criminal Justice System
  • Hearing: Oversight Hearing on the Federal Bureau of Prisons and Implementation of the First Step Act
  • Hearing: The Administration of Bail by State and Federal Courts: A Call for Reform
  • Hearing: Oversight Hearing on Policing Practices (2019
  • Hearing: Oversight Hearing on Policing Practices and Law Enforcement Accountability (2020)
  • Hearing: Fentanyl Analogues: Perspectives on Classwide Scheduling
  • Hearing: Returning Citizens: Challenges and Opportunities for Reentry
  • Hearing: Presidential Clemency and Opportunities for Reform

Spotlight: After examining federal marijuana laws, with a particular focus on how such laws disproportionately impact minority communities, the Committee passed H.R. 3884, the “Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement (MORE) Act of 2019,” historic legislation to reform federal marijuana laws. The bill would decriminalize marijuana at the federal level, provide much-needed resources to address the needs of communities that have been most seriously impacted by the War on Drugs, and provide for the expungement of federal marijuana convictions and arrests.


 

 

 

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Promoting Transparency, Efficiency, and Fairness in the Federal Courts



Our independent federal judiciary is the envy of the world, and the Judiciary Committee is committed to ensuring that the public can continue to have full confidence in the courts. The Committee held hearings on ideas for promoting transparency, accountability, and access to justice within the federal judiciary; addressing sexual harassment and other workplace misconduct within the federal judiciary; examining the influence of dark money on the judiciary; and opportunities for innovation during the COVID-19 pandemic. It also passed several bills to streamline the administration and accessibility of certain courts, to provide greater access to court records, and to ensure that Supreme Court Justices are protected wherever they go.

  • H.R. 1569, To amend title 28, United States Code, to add Flagstaff and Yuma to the list of locations in which court shall be held in the judicial district for the State of Arizona. [Marked Up, Passed House, LAW]
  • H.R. 4258, the “Reauthorizing Security for Supreme Court Justices Act of 2019” [Marked Up, Passed House, LAW]
  • H.R. 1123, the “Divisional Realignment for the Eastern District of Arkansas Act of 2019” [Marked Up, Passed House, LAW]
  • H.R. 3713, To amend title 28, United States Code, provide an additional place for holding court for the Western District of Washington, and for other purposes. [Marked Up]
  • H.R. 8235, the "Open Courts Act of 2020" [Marked Up]
  • Hearing: Examining the Use of “Snap” Removals to Circumvent the Forum Defendant Rule
  • Hearing: The Federal Judiciary in the 21st Century: Ensuring the Public’s Right of Access to the Courts
  • Hearing: The Federal Judiciary in the 21st Century: Ideas for Promoting Ethics, Accountability, and Transparency
  • Hearing: Protecting Federal Judiciary Employees from Sexual Harassment, Discrimination, and Other Workplace Misconduct
  • Hearing: Federal Courts During the Covid-19 Pandemic: Best Practices, Opportunities for Innovation, and Lessons for the Future
  • Hearing: Maintaining Judicial Independence and the Rule of Law: Examining the Causes and Consequences of Court Capture

 

 

 

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Examining President Trump’s Misconduct



In 2019, President Trump withheld vital military assistance from the government of Ukraine in order to coerce our ally to announce an investigation into his political rival. When Congress discovered his scheme, President Trump attempted to hide misconduct—and to defy congressional subpoenas by refusing to provide documents or witnesses to the investigating committees. For these actions, the Judiciary Committee recommended that the House of Representatives impeach President Trump for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

The President’s conduct fits a pattern of behavior. His infamous phone call with the President of Ukraine occurred just one day after Special Counsel Robert Mueller testified before the Judiciary Committee regarding his report on the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election. The Special Counsel’s report revealed that President Trump’s campaign welcomed Russia’s efforts on his behalf and that he attempted to obstruct the Special Counsel’s investigation into his conduct. 

The Judiciary Committee held a series of hearings to provide Americans with a greater understanding of the President’s behavior. The Committee has also had considerable success in court by filing key suits to protect its oversight authority and to ensure that Congress and the American public would have access to the full Mueller Report and related materials and witnesses. These matters are currently pending at the U.S. Supreme Court and the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals. The Committee has also filed amicus briefs on a range of cases relating to the Committee's jurisdiction.

  • H. Res. 755, Articles of Impeachment Against President Donald John Trump [Marked Up, Passed House]
  • Hearing: The Impeachment Inquiry into President Donald J. Trump: Constitutional Grounds for Presidential Impeachment
  • Hearing: The Impeachment Inquiry into President Donald J. Trump: Presentations from the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence and House Judiciary Committee
  • H. Con. Res. 24, Expressing the sense of Congress that the report of Special Counsel Mueller should be made available to the public and to Congress. [Passed House]
  • Hearing: Oversight of the U.S. Department of Justice
  • Hearing: Lessons from the Mueller Report: Presidential Obstruction and Other Crimes
  • Hearing: Lessons from the Mueller Report, Part II: Bipartisan Perspectives
  • Hearing: Lessons from the Mueller Report, Part III: “Constitutional Processes for Addressing Presidential Misconduct”
  • Hearing: Oversight of the Report on the Investigation into Russian Interference in the 2016 Presidential Election: Former Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller, III
  • Hearing: Presidential Obstruction of Justice and Abuse of Power

 

 

 

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Holding Hearings to Address Critical Issues Facing America



Hearings play a critical role in aiding members of Congress as they seek to shine a spotlight on and draft solutions to problems facing the country. They provide an opportunity for members to hear from and question a range of witnesses, including legal scholars, experts, and impacted individuals. They also are a key component of the Committee’s oversight work. This Congress, the Committee held 90 hearings, including: 

  • H.R. 1, the “For the People Act of 2019”
  • Preventing Gun Violence: A Call to Action
  • Oversight of the U.S. Department of Justice
  • Oversight of the Trump Administration’s Family Separation Policy
  • The National Emergencies Act of 1976
  • Protecting Dreamers and TPS Recipients
  • Reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act
  • Diagnosing the Problem: Exploring the Effects of Consolidation and Anticompetitive Conduct in Health Care Markets
  • History and Enforcement of the Voting Rights Act of 1965
  • The State of Competition in the Wireless Market: Examining the Impact of the Proposed Merger of T-Mobile and Sprint on Consumers, Workers, and the Internet
  • Lost Einsteins: Lack of Diversity in Patent Inventorship and the Impact on America’s Innovation Economy
  • Examining the Constitutional Role of the Pardon Power
  • H.R. 5, the “Equality Act”
  • Securing the Future of American Agriculture
  • Hate Crimes and the Rise of White Nationalism
  • Equal Rights Amendment
  • Oversight of the U.S. Department of Justice: Report by Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller, III on the Investigation Into Russian Interference in the 2016 Presidential Election; and Related Matters
  • Enforcement of the Voting Rights Act in the State of Texas
  • Oversight of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office
  • Executive Privilege and Congressional Oversight
  • Justice Denied: Forced Arbitration and the Erosion of our Legal System
  • Oversight of the Report by Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller, III: Former White House Counsel Donald F. McGahn, II
  • Threats to Reproductive Rights in America
  • Lessons from the Mueller Report: Presidential Obstruction and Other Crimes
  • The Need to Reauthorize the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund
  • Online Platforms and Market Power, Part 1: The Free and Diverse Press
  • H.R. 40 and the Path to Restorative Justice
  • Lessons from the Mueller Report, Part II: Bipartisan Perspectives
  • The Federal Judiciary in the 21st Century: Ideas for Promoting Ethics, Accountability, and Transparency
  • Oversight of Bankruptcy Law and Legislative Proposals
  • Continuing Challenges to the Voting Rights Act Since Shelby County v. Holder
  • Oversight of the U.S. Copyright Office
  • Marijuana Laws in America: Racial Justice and the Need for Reform
  • Lessons from the Mueller Report, Part III: “Constitutional Processes for Addressing Presidential Misconduct”
  • California Criminal Justice Reform: Potential Lessons for the Nation
  • Overcrowding and Prolonged Detention at CBP Facilities
  • Women and Girls in the Criminal Justice System
  • Policy Changes and Processing Delays at U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services
  • Online Platforms and Market Power, Part 2: Innovation and Entrepreneurship
  • Counterfeits and Cluttering: Emerging Threats to the Integrity of the Trademark System and the Impact on American Consumers and Businesses
  • Oversight of the Report on the Investigation into Russian Interference in the 2016 Presidential Election: Former Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller, III
  • Oversight of Family Separation and U.S. Customs and Border Protection Short-Term Custody under the Trump Administration
  • Discriminatory Barriers to Voting
  • Oversight of the Trump Administration’s Border Policies and the Relationship Between Anti-Immigrant Rhetoric and Domestic Terrorism
  • Evidence of Current and Ongoing Voting Discrimination
  • Presidential Obstruction of Justice and Abuse of Power
  • Oversight of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act
  • Oversight Hearing on Policing Practices (2019)
  • Member Day Hearing
  • Oversight of the Trump Administration’s Muslim Ban
  • Congressional Authority to Protect Voting Rights After Shelby County v. Holder
  • Protecting America from Assault Weapons
  • The Expansion and Troubling Use of ICE Detention
  • Community Responses to Gun Violence in our Cities
  • The Federal Judiciary in the 21st Century: Ensuring the Public’s Right of Access to the Courts
  • Securing America’s Elections
  • Legislative Proposals to Strengthen the Voting Rights Act
  • Oversight Hearing on the Federal Bureau of Prisons and Implementation of the First Step Act
  • Online Platforms and Market Power, Part 3: The Role of Data and Privacy in Competition
  • Securing America’s Elections Part II: Oversight of Government Agencies
  • Antitrust and Economic Opportunity: Competition in Labor Markets
  • The Impact of Current Immigration Policies on Service Members and Veterans, and their Families
  • Online Platforms and Market Power, Part 4: Perspectives of the Antitrust Agencies
  • The Administration of Bail by State and Federal Courts: A Call for Reform
  • Examining the Use of “Snap” Removals to Circumvent the Forum Defendant Rule
  • The Patent Trial and Appeal Board and the Appointments Clause: Implications of Recent Court Decisions
  • The Impeachment Inquiry into President Donald J. Trump: Constitutional Grounds for Presidential Impeachment
  • The Impeachment Inquiry into President Donald J. Trump: Presentations from the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence and House Judiciary Committee
  • Field Hearing: Online Platforms and Market Power, Part 5: Competitors in the Digital Economy
  • Fentanyl Analogues: Perspectives on Classwide Scheduling
  • Courts in Crisis: The State of Judicial Independence and Due Process in U.S. Immigration Courts
  • Oversight of the Federal Bureau of Investigation
  • Citizens United at 10: The Consequences for Democracy and Potential Responses by Congress
  • Protecting Federal Judiciary Employees from Sexual Harassment, Discrimination, and Other Workplace Misconduct
  • Returning Citizens: Challenges and Opportunities for Reentry
  • The Current State of the U.S. Refugee Program
  • Presidential Clemency and Opportunities for Reform
  • Protecting the Right to Vote During the COVID-19 Pandemic
  • Oversight Hearing on Policing Practices and Law Enforcement Accountability (2020)
  • Oversight of the Department of Justice: Political Interference and Threats to Prosecutorial Independence
  • Federal Courts During the Covid-19 Pandemic: Best Practices, Opportunities for Innovation, and Lessons for the Future
  • Oversight of the Department of Justice
  • Oversight of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services
  • Online Platforms and Market Power, Part 6: Examining the Dominance of Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google
  • Maintaining Judicial Independence and the Rule of Law: Examining the Causes and Consequences of Court Capture
  • Immigrants as Essential Workers During COVID-19
  • Oversight of the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice
  • Diversity in America: The Representation of People of Color in the Media
  • Copyright and the Internet in 2020: Reactions to the Copyright Office’s Report on the Efficacy of 17 U.S.C. 512 After Two Decades
  • Proposals to Strengthen the Antitrust Laws and Restore Competition Online
     

 

 

 

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Taking Action in Committee: Markups



During Committee markups, Members have the opportunity to debate the merits of legislation and offer and vote on amendments. After this process, the Committee can then vote to recommend consideration by the full House of Representatives. Markups are an important part of the legislative process, and this Congress, the Committee marked up 78 bills:

  • H.R. 4, the “John R. Lewis Voting Rights Act of 2020”  
  • H.R. 5, the “Equality Act” 
  • H.R. 8, the “Bipartisan Background Checks Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 35, the “Emmett Till Antilynching Act”
  • H.R. 549, the “Venezuela TPS Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 565, the “Advancing Mutual Interests and Growing Our Success (AMIGOS) Act”
  • H.R. 631, For the relief of Arpita Kurdekar, Girish Kurdekar, and Vandana Kurdekar. 
  • H.R. 677, the “21st Century President Act”
  • H.R. 683, the “Puerto Rico Recovery Accuracy in Disclosures Act of 2019 (PRRADA)”
  • H.R. 835, the “Rodchenkov Anti-Doping Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 886, the “Veteran Treatment Court Coordination Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 948, the “No Oil Producing and Exporting Cartels Act of 2019 (NOPEC)” 
  • H.R. 965, the “Creating and Restoring Equal Access to Equivalent Samples (CREATES) Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 1112, the “Enhanced Background Checks Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 1123, the “Divisional Realignment for the Eastern District of Arkansas Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 1186, the “Keep Americans Safe Act” 
  • H.R. 1236, the “Extreme Risk Protection Order Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 1327, the “Never Forget the Heroes: James Zadroga, Ray Pfeifer, and Luis Alvarez Permanent Authorization of the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund Act” 
  • H.R. 1423, the “Forced Arbitration Injustice Repeal (FAIR) Act” 
  • H.R. 1548, For the relief of Maria Carmen Castro Ramirez and J. Refugio Carreno Rojas.
  • H.R. 1569, To amend title 28, United States Code, to add Flagstaff and Yuma to the list of locations in which court shall be held in the judicial district for the State of Arizona. 
  • H.R. 1585, the “Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 1986, the “Effective Prosecution of Possession of Biological Toxins and Agents Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 2214, the “National Origin-Based Antidiscrimination for Nonimmigrants (NO BAN) Act”
  • H.R. 2336, the “Family Farmer Relief Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 2368, the “Supporting and Treating Officers in Crisis (STOIC) Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 2374, the “Stop Significant and Time-wasting Abuse Limiting Legitimate Innovation of New Generics (Stop STALLING) Act” 
  • H.R. 2375, the “Preserve Access to Affordable Generics and Biosimilars Act” 
  • H.R. 2376, the “Prescription Pricing for the People Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 2426, the “Copyright Alternative in Small-Claims Enforcement (CASE) Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 2438, the “Not Invisible Act of 2019”
  • H.R. 2648, the “Student Borrower Bankruptcy Relief Act of 2020” 
  • H.R. 2678, the “No President is Above the Law Act”
  • H.R. 2708, the “Disarm Hate Act” 
  • H.R. 2733, the “Savanna’s Act”
  • H.R. 2820, the “Dream Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 2821, the “American Promise Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 2938, the “Honoring American Veterans in Extreme Need (HAVEN) Act”
  • H.R. 3239, the “Humanitarian Standards for Individuals in Customs and Border Protection Custody Act” 
  • H.R. 3283, To amend title 4, United States Code, to permit the flag of the United States to be flown at half-staff in the event of the death of the Mayor of the District of Columbia.
  • H.R. 3304, the “National Guard and Reservists Debt Relief Extension Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 3311, the “Small Business Reorganization Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 3713, To amend title 28, United States Code, provide an additional place for holding court for the Western District of Washington, and for other purposes. 
  • H.R. 3884, the “Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement (MORE) Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 3942, the “Preventing Online Sales of E-Cigarettes to Children Act” 
  • H.R. 3991, the “Affordable Prescriptions for Patients Through Improvements to Patent Litigation Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 4018, To provide that the amount of time that an elderly offender must serve before being eligible for placement in home detention is to be reduced by the amount of good time credits earned by the prisoner, and for other purposes."
  • H.R. 4225, For the relief of Maria Isabel Bueso Barrera, Alberto Bueso Mendoza, Karla Maria Barrera De Bueso, and Ana Lucia Bueso Barrera. 
  • H.R. 4258, the “Reauthorizing Security for Supreme Court Justices Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 5038, the “Farm Workforce Modernization Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 5053, the “Justice for Juveniles Act” 
  • H.R. 5133, the “Affordable Prescriptions for Patients Through Promoting Competition Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 5140, the “Satellite Television Community Protection and Promotion Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 5309, the “Creating a Respectful and Open World for Natural Hair (CROWN) Act of 2020” 
  • H.R. 5546, the “Effective Assistance of Counsel in the Digital Era Act”
  • H.R. 5581, the “Access to Counsel Act of 2020”
  • H.R. 5602, the “Domestic Terrorism Prevention Act of 2020”
  • H.R. 6100, the “Strengthening the Opposition to Female Genital Mutilation (STOP FGM) Act of 2020”
  • H.R. 6196, the “Trademark Modernization Act (TM Act) of 2020”
  • H.R. 6813, the “Promoting Alzheimer's Awareness to Prevent Elder Abuse Act” 
  • H.R. 7120, the “George Floyd Justice in Policing Act of 2020”
  • H.R. 7146, For the relief of Victoria Galindo Lopez. 
  • H.R. 7370, the “Protecting Employees and Retirees in Business Bankruptcies Act of 2020” 
  • H.R. 7572, For the relief of Median El-Moustrah. 
  • H.R. 7636, the “Custodial Interrogation Recording Act” 
  • H.R. 7694, the “Abuse of the Pardon Prevention Act”
  • H.R. 7718, the “Protecting the Health and Wellness of Babies and Pregnant Women in Custody Act” 
  • H.R. 8124, the “Criminal Judicial Administration Act of 2020” 
  • H.R. 8161, the “One Stop Shop Community Reentry Program Act of 2020” 
  • H.R. 8169, the “Elder Abuse Protection Act of 2020” 
  • H.R. 8225, the “Fight Notario Fraud Act of 2020” 
  • H.R. 8235, the “Open Courts Act of 2020”
  • H.R. 8354, the “Servicemembers and Veterans Initiative Act of 2020” 
  • H.R. 8366, the “Protecting Homeowners in Bankruptcy Act of 2020”
  • H. J. Res. 79, Removing the deadline for the ratification of the equal rights amendment. 
  • H. Res. 243, Resolution of inquiry requesting the President and directing the Attorney General to transmit, respectively, certain documents to the House of Representatives relating to the actions of former Federal Bureau of Investigation Acting Director Andrew McCabe.
  • H. Res. 694, Recognizing the importance of the Civil Rights Act of 1866 and the laws derived therefrom.
  • H. Res. 755, Articles of Impeachment Against President Donald John Trump

 

 

 

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House Floor Votes



The House Judiciary Committee’s work for the people extends beyond the walls of the Committee hearing room; so far this Congress, 92 Judiciary bills passed the House of Representatives. Many of these bills were first voted on in committee, while others were able to go directly to the House floor and garner strong bipartisan support, and some were incorporated into larger bills. These bills include:

  • H.R. 1, the “For the People Act of 2019”
  • H.R. 4, the “John R. Lewis Voting Rights Act of 2020”   
  • H.R. 5, the “Equality Act” 
  • H.R. 6, the “American Dream and Promise Act of 2019”  
  • H.R. 8, the “Bipartisan Background Checks Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 35, the “Emmett Till Antilynching Act”
  • H.R. 439, the “National FFA Organization's Federal Charter Amendments Act”
  • H.R. 450, the “Preventing Crimes Against Veterans Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 494, the “Tiffany Joslyn Juvenile Accountability Block Grant Reauthorization and Bullying Prevention and Intervention Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 498, the “Clean Up the Code Act of 2019”
  • H.R. 507, the “Put Trafficking Victims First Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 549, the “Venezuela TPS Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 565, the “Advancing Mutual Interests and Growing Our Success (AMIGOS) Act” 
  • H.R. 677, the “21st Century President Act” 
  • H.R. 724, the “Preventing Animal Cruelty and Torture Act” 
  • H.R. 752, the “Open Book on Equal Access to Justice Act”
  • H.R. 777, the “Debbie Smith Reauthorization Act of 2019”  
  • H.R. 835, the “Rodchenkov Anti-Doping Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 886, the “Veteran Treatment Court Coordination Act of 2019”
  • H.R. 965, the “Creating and Restoring Equal Access to Equivalent Samples (CREATES) Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 1044, the “Fairness for High-Skilled Immigrants Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 1112, the “Enhanced Background Checks Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 1123, the “Divisional Realignment for the Eastern District of Arkansas Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 1327, the “Never Forget the Heroes: James Zadroga, Ray Pfeifer, and Luis Alvarez Permanent Authorization of the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund Act” 
  • H.R. 1418, the “Competitive Health Insurance Reform Act of 2019”
  • H.R. 1423, the “Forced Arbitration Injustice Repeal (FAIR) Act” 
  • H.R. 1548, For the relief of Maria Carmen Castro Ramirez and J. Refugio Carreno Rojas.
  • H.R. 1569, To amend title 28, United States Code, to add Flagstaff and Yuma to the list of locations in which court shall be held in the judicial district for the State of Arizona. 
  • H.R. 1579/S. 693, the “National POW/MIA Flag Act” 
  • H.R. 1585, the “Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 1636/S. 2163, the “Commission on the Social Status of Black Men and Boys Act”  
  • H.R. 1641/S. 504, the “Let Everyone Get Involved in Opportunities for National Service (LEGIONS) Act” 
  • H.R. 1663, the “Foundation of the Federal Bar Association Charter Amendments Act of 2019"
  • H.R. 1986/S. 744, the “Effective Prosecution of Possession of Biological Toxins and Agents Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 2214, the “National Origin-Based Antidiscrimination for Nonimmigrants (NO BAN) Act”  
  • H.R. 2336, the “Family Farmer Relief Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 2368/S. 998, the “Supporting and Treating Officers in Crisis (STOIC) Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 2379, To reauthorize the Bulletproof Vest Partnership Grant Program. 
  • H.R. 2426, the “Copyright Alternative in Small-Claims Enforcement (CASE) Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 2438/S. 982, the “Not Invisible Act of 2019”
  • H.R. 2733/S. 227, the “Savanna’s Act”
  • H.R. 2877, To add Ireland to the E-3 nonimmigrant visa program.
  • H.R. 2938, the “Honoring American Veterans in Extreme Need (HAVEN) Act” 
  • H.R. 3238/S. 1321, the “Defending the Integrity of Voting Systems Act”
  • H.R. 3239, the “Humanitarian Standards for Individuals in Customs and Border Protection Custody Act” 
  • H.R. 3304, the “National Guard and Reservists Debt Relief Extension Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 3311, the “Small Business Reorganization Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 3545, the “National Opposition to Hate, Assault, and Threats to Equality (NO HATE) Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 3735/S. 2746, the “Law Enforcement Suicide Data Collection Act” 
  • H.R. 3942, the “Preventing Online Sales of E-Cigarettes to Children Act” 
  • H.R. 3991, the “Affordable Prescriptions for Patients Through Improvements to Patent Litigation Act of 2019”
  • H.R. 4018, To provide that the amount of time that an elderly offender must serve before being eligible for placement in home detention is to be reduced by the amount of good time credits earned by the prisoner, and for other purposes. 
  • H.R. 4258, the “Reauthorizing Security for Supreme Court Justices Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 4803, the “Citizenship for Children of Military Members and Civil Servants Act” 
  • H.R. 5038, the “Farm Workforce Modernization Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 5053, the “Justice for Juveniles Act” 
  • H.R. 5128, the “Saudi Fugitive Declassification Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 5133, the “Affordable Prescriptions for Patients Through Promoting Competition Act of 2019”
  • H.R. 5140, the “Satellite Television Community Protection and Promotion Act of 2019”
  • H.R. 5277, To amend section 442 of title 18, United States Code, to exempt certain interests in mutual funds, unit investment trusts, employee benefit plans, and retirement plans from conflict of interest limitations for the Government Publishing Office.
  • H.R. 5309, the “Creating a Respectful and Open World for Natural Hair (CROWN) Act of 2020” 
  • H.R. 5546, the “Effective Assistance of Counsel in the Digital Era Act” 
  • H.R. 5581, the “Access to Counsel Act of 2020” 
  • H.R. 5602, the “Domestic Terrorism Prevention Act of 2020”
  • H.R. 6100, the “Strengthening the Opposition to Female Genital Mutilation (STOP FGM) Act of 2020”
  • H.R. 6172, the “USA FREEDOM Reauthorization Act of 2020”
  • H.R. 6400, the “Emergency Community Supervision Act” 
  • H.R. 6414, the “COVID-19 Correctional Facility Emergency Response Act of 2020” 
  • H.R. 6509, the “Public Safety Officer Pandemic Response Act of 2020”/ S. 3607, the “Safeguarding America's First Responders Act of 2020” 
  • H.R. 6813, the “Promoting Alzheimer's Awareness to Prevent Elder Abuse Act” 
  • H.R. 7036, the “Antitrust Criminal Penalty Enhancement and Reform Permanent Extension Act”
  • H.R. 7120, the “George Floyd Justice in Policing Act of 2020”
  • H.R. 7259, the “Patents for Humanity Program Improvement Act”
  • H.R. 7718, the “Protecting the Health and Wellness of Babies and Pregnant Women in Custody Act” 
  • H.R. 7881/S. 2330, the “Empowering Olympic, Paralympic, and Amateur Athletes Act of 2020”
  • H.R. 8089, the “Emergency Stopgap USCIS Stabilization Act” 
  • H.R. 8124, the “Criminal Judicial Administration Act of 2020” 
  • H.R. 8225, the “Fight Notario Fraud Act of 2020” 
  • H.R. 8366, the “Protecting Homeowners in Bankruptcy Act of 2020”
  • H. J. Res. 79, Removing the deadline for the ratification of the equal rights amendment. 
  • H. Res. 183, Condemning anti-Semitism as hateful expressions of intolerance that are contradictory to the values and aspirations that define the people of the United States and condemning anti-Muslim discrimination and bigotry against minorities as hateful expressions of intolerance that are contrary to the values and aspirations of the United States. 
  • H. Res. 354, Celebrating the 100th anniversary of the passage and ratification of the 19th Amendment, providing for women’s suffrage, to the Constitution of the United States. 
  • H. Res. 41, Rejecting White nationalism and White supremacy.
  • H. Res. 489, Condemning President Trump’s racist comments directed at Members of Congress. 
  • H. Res. 755, Articles of Impeachment Against President Donald John Trump. 
  • H. Res. 908, Condemning all forms of anti-Asian sentiment as related to COVID-19.
  • H. Res. 1046, Supporting the designation of August 2020 as National Women’s Suffrage Month.
  • H. Res. 1153, Condemning unwanted, unnecessary medical procedures on individuals without their full, informed consent. 
  • H. Res. 1154, Condemning QAnon and rejecting the conspiracy theories it promotes.
  • H. Res. 1155, Reaffirming the House of Representative’s commitment to the orderly and peaceful transfer of power called for in the Constitution of the United States, and for other purposes. [Passed House]
  • H. Con. Res. 24, Expressing the sense of Congress that the report of Special Counsel Mueller should be made available to the public and to Congress. 
  • S. 1380, the “Due Process Protections Act” 

 

 

 

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Turning Bills Into Laws



Very few bills ever make it all the way through the House of Representatives and the Senate and are signed into law by the President. This Congress, the Judiciary Committee worked in a bipartisan fashion to bring 30 bills to the President’s desk to become laws. They include:

  • H.R. 439, the “National FFA Organization's Federal Charter Amendments Act”
  • H.R. 724, the “Preventing Animal Cruelty and Torture Act” 
  • H.R. 777, the “Debbie Smith Reauthorization Act of 2019”  
  • H.R. 886, the “Veteran Treatment Court Coordination Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 965, the “Creating and Restoring Equal Access to Equivalent Samples (CREATES) Act of 2019”  
  • H.R. 1123, the “Divisional Realignment for the Eastern District of Arkansas Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 1327, the “Never Forget the Heroes: James Zadroga, Ray Pfeifer, and Luis Alvarez Permanent Authorization of the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund Act” 
  • H.R. 1569, To amend title 28, United States Code, to add Flagstaff and Yuma to the list of locations in which court shall be held in the judicial district for the State of Arizona.
  • H.R. 1579/S. 693, the “National POW/MIA Flag Act” 
  • H.R. 1636/S. 2163, the “Commission on the Social Status of Black Men and Boys Act”  
  • H.R. 1641/S. 504, the “Let Everyone Get Involved in Opportunities for National Service (LEGIONS) Act” 
  • H.R. 1986/S. 744, the “Effective Prosecution of Possession of Biological Toxins and Agents Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 2336, the “Family Farmer Relief Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 2368/S. 998, the “Supporting and Treating Officers in Crisis (STOIC) Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 2379, To reauthorize the Bulletproof Vest Partnership Grant Program. 
  • H.R. 2438/S. 982, the “Not Invisible Act of 2019” [Marked Up, Passed House, Law]
  • H.R. 2733/S. 227, the “Savanna’s Act”
  • H.R. 2938, the “Honoring American Veterans in Extreme Need Act (HAVEN) Act” 
  • H.R. 3238/S. 1321, the “Defending the Integrity of Voting Systems Act”
  • H.R. 3304, the “National Guard and Reservists Debt Relief Extension Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 3311, the “Small Business Reorganization Act of 2019”
  • H.R. 3735/S. 2746, the “Law Enforcement Suicide Data Collection Act” 
  • H.R. 4258, the “Reauthorizing Security for Supreme Court Justices Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 4803, the “Citizenship for Children of Military Members and Civil Servants Act” 
  • H.R. 5128, the “Saudi Fugitive Declassification Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 5140, the “Satellite Television Community Protection and Promotion Act of 2019” 
  • H.R. 5277, To amend section 442 of title 18, United States Code, to exempt certain interests in mutual funds, unit investment trusts, employee benefit plans, and retirement plans from conflict of interest limitations for the Government Publishing Office.
  • H.R. 6509, the “Public Safety Officer Pandemic Response Act of 2020”/ S. 3607, the “Safeguarding America's First Responders Act of 2020” 
  • H.R. 7881/S. 2330, the “Empowering Olympic, Paralympic, and Amateur Athletes Act of 2020”
  • S. 1380, the “Due Process Protections Act” 

 

 

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By the Numbers


Click here for a printable By the Numbers document. 

 


 

 

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More on Accomplishments Report of the Committee on the Judiciary | 2019 - 2020